The SPF’S program’s initiative is to reduce the alcohol use rate and contributing factors for 8th-12th graders by implementing a communication campaign target parents and adults, supporting the enforcement of local Social Host Ordinances, advocating for school participation in the Illinois Youth Survey, and more.

The Strategic Prevention Framework-Partnerships (SPF-PFS) Grant serves the villages of Schaumburg, Hoffman Estates, and Palatine with funding awarded to Kenneth Young Center from the Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The goal of the SPF-PFS Grant, also known as the Underage Drinking Prevention Grant, is to decrease past 30-day alcohol rate and contributing factors for 8th-12th graders in Schaumburg, Hoffman Estates, and Palatine.

SPF-PFS will utilize the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS) and local data for data-driven decision-making and implementation of evidence-based environmental strategies. SPF-PFS staff are required to work with a community coalition (Communities for Positive Youth Development) to implement all components of the Strategic Prevention Framework (pictured below) in a culturally competent and sustainable manner.

SAMHSA’s Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) is a planning process for preventing substance use and misuse. The five steps (Assessment, Capacity, Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation) and two guiding principles of the SPF (Sustainability and Cultural Competence) offer prevention professionals a comprehensive process for addressing the substance misuse and related behavioral health problems facing their communities.


SPF-PFS will utilize the Illinois Youth Survey (IYS) and local data for data-driven decision-making and implementation of evidence-based environmental strategies. SPF-PFS staff are required to work with a community coalition (Communities for Positive Youth Development) to implement all components of the Strategic Prevention Framework (pictured below) in a culturally competent and sustainable manner.

SAMHSA’s Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) is a planning process for preventing substance use and misuse. The five steps (Assessment, Capacity, Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation) and two guiding principles of the SPF (Sustainability and Cultural Competence) offer prevention professionals a comprehensive process for addressing the substance misuse and related behavioral health problems facing their communities.

Staff from the SPF-PFS Grant will be implementing four strategies in the community to address local contributing factors to underage drinking:

  1. Adult Communication Campaign
  2. Parent Communication Campaign
  3. Party Prevention and Controlled Party Dispersal
  4. Social Host Policy Education, Promotion, and Enforcement


Subcommittee Chair: Eric O’Brien, Streamwood Behavioral Health System

The Strategic Planning Subcommittee (Data and Membership) is charged with the tasks of ensuring that the coalition’s activities are data-driven using the best available local data, and ensuring that the coalition continues to be broadly representative of the service area. The subcommittee oversees the assessment process for all coalition projects and grants in coordination with the coalition’s staff in accordance with funding requirements and best practices. It also conducts interest interviews and new member orientations. Please click here to view the coalition’s Needs Assessment for the Underage Drinking Prevention Grant.


Communication Campaigns

Target Audience: Parents and Other Adults

How to Talk to your Teen about Underage Drinking

As children approach their teen years, they begin to experience many emotional and physical changes, and these changes can be challenging. Some youth may experiment with alcohol to try to deal with the challenges of growing up. For most youth, it is not just one thing that influences them to drink, but rather a combination of factors. These factors can include stress caused by a desire to fit in or to get good grades. For some youth, going to a new school can be a trigger.

No matter what issues your child is facing, one of the best things you can do to prevent them from turning to alcohol is to talk with them.

  • Short, frequent discussions can have a real impact on your child’s decisions about alcohol. Talking to your child at an early age about drinking is the first step toward keeping them alcohol-free. But as they enter junior high and high school, the pressure to try alcohol increases. It’s important to continue the conversation throughout adolescence.
  • Talking often builds an open, trusting relationship with your child. Young people are more likely to avoid drinking when they have a strong, trusting relationship with their parents. Get into the habit of chatting with your child every day. It will make it easier to have serious conversations about things like alcohol, and will make your child more comfortable coming to you for advice.
  • Lots of little talks are more effective than one “big talk.” Sitting down for the “big talk” about alcohol can be intimidating for both you and your child. Try using everyday opportunities to talk—in the car, during dinner, or while you and your child are watching TV. Having lots of little talks takes the pressure off trying to get all of the information out in one lengthy discussion, and your child will be less likely to tune you out.
  • When you do talk about alcohol, make your views and rules clear. Take the time to discuss your beliefs and opinions about alcohol with your child. Be honest and express a clear, consistent message that underage drinking is unacceptable. When they feel that you are being real and honest with them, they will be more likely to respect your rules about underage drinking.
  • As children get older, the conversation changes. What you say to a 9-year-old about alcohol is different from what you say to a 15-year-old. Young people also can’t learn all they need to know from a single discussion. Make sure that the information you offer your child fits their age. As they get older, you can give them more information and reinforce your rules.
  • Remember that the conversation goes both ways. Although talking to your child about your thoughts about alcohol is essential, it is also important to hear their point of view. Give your child the opportunity to ask you questions, and listen to what they have to say. Young people who have parents who listen to their feelings and concerns are more likely to say “no” to alcohol.
  • What you do is just as important as what you say. In addition to talking often with your child about alcohol, it’s important to set a good example. If you choose to drink, you can positively influence your child by drinking in moderation and NEVER driving when you have been drinking. Be aware of where you keep your alcohol, and always remind your child that the alcohol in your house is off-limits.

In short, keep these tips in mind and #PreventUnderageDrinking

  • Be involved in your children’s lives.
  • Encourage your children’s growing independence, but set appropriate limits.
  • Make it easy for your children to share information about their lives.
  • Know where your children are, what they are doing, whom they are with, and whom they are friends with.
  • Make an effort to get to know the parents of your children’s friends. Share your rules about not allowing alcohol use.
  • Find ways for your children to be involved in family life such as doing chores or caring for a younger sibling.
  • Set clear rules, including rules about alcohol use. Enforce the rules you set.
  • Help your children find ways to have fun without alcohol.
  • Do not let your children attend parties at which alcohol is served. Do not allow alcohol at parties in your own home.
  • Help your children avoid dangerous situations such as riding in a car driven by someone who has been drinking.
  • Help your children get professional help if you are worried about their involvement with alcohol.
  • Create a pledge between yourself and your children that promises they will not drink alcohol.
  • Source: the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
  • Want More Tips and Resources? Click Here!


Are you familiar with the Illinois Social Host Law?

According to the Illinois Liquor Control Commission, when kids drink alcohol, 65% of the time it is consumed at home or a friend’s house. The Illinois Social Host Law holds parents and other adults accountable for knowingly permitting underage youth to consume alcoholic beverages at their residence or on other property they own or otherwise control.

The law sends a message that:

  • hosting underage drinking parties is unacceptable conduct;
  • empowers concerned citizens to report suspected underage drinking; and
  • provides law enforcement with a tool to address underage drinking parties that are a threat to public health.

There are many tragic health, social, and economic problems that result from underage drinking, including but not limited to:

  • Injury and death
  • Violent crimes
  • Injuries (e.g., burns, falls, and drowning)
  • Brain impairment
  • Alcohol dependence
  • Risky sexual activity/unplanned pregnancy
  • Academic problems
  • Alcohol and drug poisoning

Penalties for providing alcohol to minors

If you allow or host a party at your house and provide alcohol to people under age 21 (or if you know or should have known that they are drinking alcohol), you are guilty of a Class A misdemeanor. This will result in a fine.

If a minor who was drinking at your house injures or kills someone, you are guilty of a Class 4 felony.

Note that you are held responsible regardless if you are the one who provides the alcohol AND regardless if you are home or not. You will not be guilty of violating the law if you are the first one request help from the police to help remove the underage drinkers and stop the gathering.